Which Internal Door Should I Choose?

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One of the least appreciated parts of interior design is the door. A good door acts as an accent to the rest of the interior décor while still serving important functions. The finish and trim of the door add to the room’s aesthetics, the door’s thickness muffles noises, while the design either provides privacy or lets light in, as you see fit.

A door provides easy access to all what is behind it and ensures stable temperatures inside the room i.e. stopping drafts while also not transforming your room into a greenhouse. The type and style of internal door that you choose for every room will depend on the room’s look as well as the properties that you consider to be most important. Take a look the interior doors of 2019 and see which one complements your home.

Which Style of Internal Door?

When you choose the style of internal door, it is important to consider not only the practical considerations such as whether to buy a slab or pre-hung door, but also whether you want French doors, internal bifold doors, or a standard door. If you choose the standard design, do you want doors with glass panels, ornate Victorian doors, heavy, solid oak internal doors, flush door with a faux hardwood veneer, or stile-and-rail designs with feature panels?

Flush doors are the most affordable option available to you and they are also convenient for other reasons because they are typically hollow and therefore light and easy to work with. However, it also means that it is impossible to cut them down to size, which means that if you have a shorter or narrower internal door frame than the standard sizes, you are likely to find it hard to find a door that fits.

Which Choice of Material for Your Interior Door?

The material that you choose for your internal doors depends on the door’s location as well as how often it will be used. Heavy oak doors are perfect for high traffic areas as well as bedrooms where thickness is useful for reducing noise.

Glazed internal doors or hollow core doors look great, are lightweight, and might be the perfect option for low traffic areas of your house. Sliding doors may be the perfect choice for leading from the living room to the conservatory because they preserve space in the living room and let natural light into the living room if they are glazed.

Other Interior Door Considerations

The way the door opens is something that many people often fail to consider. Do you want a bypass door with staggered design where the doors slide past each other, a pocket door that slides on a track and opens into a wall, a standard hinge design where the door has hinges on either the right- or left-hand side and swings at the edge, or a bi-fold design where the doors pivot on the edge and hinge in the middle? Keep in mind when you plan the room, that if the doors hinge, you will have to clear space around that area, while you will have more leeway if they slide.

The internal door sizing is another important consideration. The style and type of door may be defined by the size of the opening in the space that you are looking at. Internal bifold doors can be the ideal option for a larger opening that divides 2 rooms, while a simple oak interior door could be just perfect for a single leaf door opening. Other door styles even have different options in a single range, which means that you are free to mix and match between frosted, clear glazed, bifold, single leaf, and unglazed options thus creating a consistent feel throughout your home.

Your budget should be the final consideration. If you would like to replace your old, tired interior doors throughout your home, then your primary objective should be to find something cost effective. If this is the case, you can choose an unfinished door and add a wood stain to help keep costs low. However, you could also be updating the interior doors to add a touch of luxury, and in such a situation the best option for you would be a solid oak door that’s finished to perfection.

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