How to Install Disc Brakes on a Bicycle

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How to Install Disc Brakes on a Bicycle

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Bikers know that having a reliable braking system is crucial to bicycle safety. Brakes are essential components of the bicycle. Although there are various types of brakes for a bicycle, disc brakes offer better performance in stopping the bicycle and do not require much in the way of maintenance. Adding disc brakes to your bicycle is not complicated, but you need to make sure that the style of your bicycle is compatible for putting on disc brakes.


Take the brake rotors and mount them onto the non-drive side of both the front and rear bicycle forks. This will keep them clear of the sprockets and fit directly on the wheel to help the brake part stop the bicycle. You will see arrows etched into the surface of the hubs, so make sure to align the rotors in the direction of the arrows. This is the indicator of which way the wheel should be spinning when in motion. Make sure that you have the adhesive on each of the bolts. Use the wrench to tighten each bolt. A torque pressure of 45 to 60 pounds is enough to safely secure each bolt.


Run the cables from the braking levers up from the front rim and rear rim and install levers on the handlebars. Place the braking levers in between the grips on the bars and the gear shifter (if there is one). You will need a small metric or Allen wrench to tighten the bolts. Test the brake levers and make sure they are tight on the handlebars.


Run the front brake cables down into the caliper mount located on the front rim or fork of the bike. Run the other cable to the rear caliper mount located on the back of the bicycle frame. Take the zip tie and attach the cables along the frame of the bike to hold in place. There needs to be some slight tension in the cable lines between the levers on the handlebars and where you first connect the cables, so the bicycle can steer properly.


Tighten the bolts from the calipers to the frame over to each brake mount adapter located on the forks of the frame. Each adapter must match the frame mounts and the rotor diameter, so check you owner's manual for the adapter measurements. Using between 70 to 90 pounds of torque, tighten the bolts to complete the installation.


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