What is a Stippling Brush?

0

Stippling brushes are used for decorative painting in interior design projects. Brushes have square or oblong thick wooden handles with long, stiff bristles that will cover a good-sized area with each pounce effect. Using a stipple brush in faux painting is considered a subtractive technique for the most part. It can be an additive technique when used to add on a glaze layer over a coat of paint by splattering on glaze beads.


What is a Stippling Brush?

0
Share.

Stippling brushes are used for decorative painting in interior design projects. Brushes have square or oblong thick wooden handles with long, stiff bristles that will cover a good-sized area with each pounce effect. Using a stipple brush in faux painting is considered a subtractive technique for the most part. It can be an additive technique when used to add on a glaze layer over a coat of paint by splattering on glaze beads.


Step One

The Subtractive Method - Paint on a section of your paint on a wall, starting from the center. As you complete each section, go back over the painted area and use the stipple brush in a direct head-on pouncing motion to dig in and remove some of the paint. Rather than being a flat color, the stippling effect gives a bit of depth and texture to the color scheme on the wall.


Step Two

The Additive Method - Dip your brush into the glaze mix and gently slap the brush toward the wall to add on a dribble or splatter effect. It also adds a bit of sparkle highlight to the color, which can look very nice with the right kind of lighting. You can come back over the glaze by using the pouncing motion on to the wall to break up any patterns forming. Change the direction of the brush hit, twisting your hand from side to side but keeping the head-on pounce motion.


Step Three

Stippling at the Corners of the Wall - Mask off the wall you are headed to by using blue painter's masking tape to provide a clean edge. Use a smaller brush to get right up to the corner and the tape. If you are using a splatter effect, do very small motions that aim the splatter right where you want it without going past the blue tape.


Step Four

Keep Your Brush Clean - Clean your brush periodically when you are using the stippling effect. The paint will build up fairly quickly, and if you are using glaze, it will congeal quickly. Use a cloth often to wipe off any congealed paint or glaze. Clean after every five to six pouncing motions, just to be safe. If there is too much collection, the stipple effect will change and ruin your design.


Share.
Share.

Leave A Reply

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. Full Cookie Disclosure...

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close