Devon

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Location

Devon is in the South West of England. The county town is Exeter. Devon is bounded on the North by the Bristol Channel, on the South by the English Channel, and on the West by Cornwall. Devon offers a great range of scenery and has two coasts, although unlike those of its neighbor these are entirely separated by the uplands of Dartmoor and Exmoor.

The Exe and the Tamar are the main rivers. Plymouth is the chief port and industrial center for South West England. It is a land of rolling hills, upland areas of forests and rugged stone. The tiny villages quiet coves and gentle valleys with rich green rolling hills sandy beaches and calm seas of Devon contrast with rugged Cornwall. Here you will find a variety of holiday choices.

The name Devonshire was common but is now rarely used, although it does feature in some names and titles (such as the Duke of Devonshire), and is still to be seen on signposts in the county.

Devon is the only county in England to have two completely separate coastlines. Both the North and South coasts offer dramatic views: much of both coastlines are named as Heritage Coast, and the South West Coast Path runs along the entire length of the both. The inland of the county has much attractive rolling rural scenery, and villages with thatched Cob cottages. All these features make Devon a popular holiday destination for many Britons. The variety of scenery and habitats means that there is an exceptional range of Dartmoor wildlife.

Devon is farming and Pastoral County (for beef and dairy cattle) with some fishing off the coastal towns. Devon “clotted” cream and West Country cider are notable products. Considerable woolen and tin industries and export trade flourished from the 12th to the 18th cent. Woolen goods are still manufactured, along with lace, pottery, and marine fixtures; clay is mined. Quiet and picturesque with a mild climate.

Whether it’s a quite or active holiday for young or old there is always plenty to see and do.

 

Attractions

DartmoorNational Park – Covers 368 square miles.An upland region of southwest England noted for its bare granite. There are remains of numerous Bronze Age settlements.

List of Castles – Berry Pomeroy Castle – Compton Castle – Dartmouth Castle –  Castle Drogo – Kingswear Castle  Lydford Castle – Okehampton Castle –  Powderham Castle –  Rougemont Castle (Exeter) – Totnes Castle 

Dartmoor Railway – operates on the route of the old Southern Railway line from Crediton to Okehampton and Meldon Quarry.  The Train travels through the picturesque area of Devon and the Dartmoor National Park. Dartmoor can be bleak in the winter so chick the weather beforehand.

Paignton Zoo – Paignton

 

Crealy Adventure Park – Exeter

 

Quaywest Water Park – Paignton

 

The National Marine Aquarium – Plymouth

 

Plymouth Dome – Plymouth (400 years of Plymouth history brought to life, fun for all ages)

 

Becky Falls – Dartmouth (50 miles of woodland)

 

Beaches – 300 miles of beautiful Devonshire coastline, where you will find more than 60 beaches of every description for surfing, swimming, sailing, relaxing in the sun or strolling along the cliffs.

 

How to get there

BY AIR ;    

There are connecting services from Exeter Airport to London Gatwick,  from Plymouth PLH to Birmingham and Glasgow Scotland.

 

BY ROAD;

The United Kingdom has an extensive Motorway Network.From London to Exeter is some 170 miles allow 4 hours by car, or at peak summer season allow 6 hours.

When travelling in Devon many of the Lanes are narrow and have high hedges. Narrow quiet roads are part of the unspoilt charm of Beautiful Devon. Much of Dartmoor has a 40mph speed limit, imposed both for your safety and that of animals grazing alongside the unfenced roads.

Nowhere is more than an hour and a half drive, for example Exeter to Plymouth is only 45 miles, whilst Exeter to Barnstaple in North Devon is 41 miles

 

BY RAIL;

Great Western Trains Fast Intercity Express’s arrive in Plymouth from London (Paddington) and Birmingham (New Street) many times throughout the day.

 

BY BUS/COACH;

National Express run daily services from Plymouth, Torquay, and Exeter to London.

Once you get to Devon there are extensive local coach services to all the outlying towns. The County Council’s website contains details of all Bus Services and their frequencies including route maps.

 

Festivals

Devon has festivals all year round, from  sailing regattas, walking festivals, sporting festivals, folk festivals, food festivals and garden festivals

Tavistock’s Goose Fair, Flaming Tar Barrels and Widecombe Fair are the more traditional events and festivals that take place.

 

Eating  Dining  Shopping

A night out in the South West gives such a variety of quaint old worlde pubs, with a variety of foods on the menu.

Devon “clotted” cream and West Country cider are notable products of Devon.

The cream tea, involving scones, jam and clotted cream, is a local specialty and may well have originated in Devon (neighbouring counties also claim it); in other countries such as New Zealand it is known as a Devonshire tea.

Be sure to browse at one of the regular farmers’ markets, a farm shop, country store or delicatessen where you will find a wide range of high quality fresh local produce and specialty food and drink.

 

History

Considerable woolen and tin industries and export trade flourished from the 12th to the 18th cent.

Exeter was the westerly outpost of Roman occupation. Devon was incorporated into Wessex early in the 8th centtury. In Elizabethan times the county reached its greatest maritime importance, and its name is associated with Walter Raleigh, Francis Drake, John Hawkins, and Richard Grenville. From Plymouth, many colonists sailed for America. In 1974, Devonshire Co. was reorganized as the nonmetropolitan county of Devon.

The name “Devon” derives from name given by the Romans to the Celtic people who inhabited the south western peninsula of Britain at the time of the Roman invasion . The Romans held the area under Military Occupation for approx 25 years.

By the ninth century, however, the major threat to Saxon control of Devon came not from the native British but from Viking raiders.

Devon has also featured in most of the civil conflicts in England since the Norman conquest, including the Wars of the Roses and Perkin Warbeck’s rising in 1497, the Prayer Book Rebellion of 1549 and the English Civil War. Perhaps most notably, the last successful military invasion of Britain, the arrival of William of Orange to launch the Glorious Revolution of 1688 which took place at Torquay.

Devon has also featured in most of the civil conflicts in England since the Norman conquest, including the Wars of the Roses and Perkin Warbeck’s rising in 1497, the Prayer Book Rebellion of 1549 and the English Civil War. Perhaps most notably, the last successful military invasion of Britain, the arrival of William of Orange to launch the Glorious Revolution of 1688 which took place at Torquay.

Devon is also known for its mariners, such as Sir Francis Drake, Gilbert, Sir Richard Grenville and Sir Walter Raleigh.
Considerable woolen and tin industries and export trade flourished from the 12th to the 18th cent.

 

Useful telephone numbers

Emergency Number 999

Airport Information; Heathrow Airport Tel +44 (0)870 000 0123

Train station: Bickleigh, Near Tiverton Devon 01884 855 671

Tourist Office: Ilfracombe Tel; 01271 863001

Holiday rents online:

National Transport Line

24 hour medical service

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