Unconventional Yet Effective Ways To Grow Plants

0

There are many benefits to growing a garden within your backyard or somewhere around your home. Aside from enhancing the aesthetics of your house, gardens with edible vegetables can also provide fresh and safe homegrown produce which are readily available. Not only that, having a backyard or home garden can improve oxygen and air circulation, which keeps the air fresh and making your home feel cool throughout the day. With many perks, you may be thinking of starting your own garden. However, not all houses are created equal some have spatial constraints, like lack of backyard space or having no backyard at all. Don’t worry. There are still other ways of growing plants even if backyard space is a problem.

Vertical Gardening

If you have minimal space in your backyard, you can plant along the fence using inexpensive and recyclable materials. You can use individual pots from used plastic bottles and hang them along the fence. You can also fasten a metal pipe to the fence and hang an unused hanging shoe organizer to create a row of evenly distributed plants on your wall. This way, you can create a convenient garden space without having to bend forward to till the soil or water the plants. There are vegetables that grow well vertically such as peas, tomatoes and cucumbers.

Keyhole Garden

Living in an area with dry or tropical climate? An ingenious way to grow plants is through a keyhole garden. This is a type of raised bed garden with a compost container at the canter. The garden’s shape is like a keyhole to provide easy access to both the compost and surrounding plants. The compost in the middle nourishes the plants within the keyhole garden. Dried leaves, fruit peelings and discarded vegetable peels and leafs make a good compost for the garden.

Hydroponics

Hydroponics is a subset of hydroculture and is a method of growing plants using mineral nutrients in water, without the need for soil. Plants can be grown with their roots in the mineral content solution only or in an inert medium such as perlite or gravel. To prolong the good health of the plants as they grow, and protect the delicate root zone, you can do so by cooling hydroponic water through the utilization of a hydroponic water chiller. Cold hydroponic water in the temperature range of 65-70°F (18-24°C) keep the nutrient solution optimal and gives the root zone access to high levels of dissolved oxygen while also suppressing plant diseases.

Straw Bale Gardening

Have an excess of straw bales at your home? You can actually use straw bales for starting your own garden, even without soil. This method does require some time to prepare. The straw has to be treated for a few weeks before you add your plants. The straw begins to break down once the straw is treated. All the necessary nutrients needed by the plants can be provided by the decomposing straw. You can plant vegetables, flowering plants or herbs on your straw bale garden.

Bucket Garden

Wondering what to do with your empty buckets? Make them productive containers for starting a garden. Commonly used in houses are 5-gallon buckets. Just allow plenty of room for your plants to grow until they mature. Since the container is closed at the bottom, be sure to include lots of organic matter in the soil, about 50% of the soil content. You can grow medium-sized plants like tomatoes, eggplants, beans, ginger and leafy green vegetables

There are a lot of innovative and ingenious ways of growing plants no matter the type of place that you have. You just need to think out of the box and find household items can be used for the purpose of gardening, like unused containers. Plants are good purifiers of the air we breathe and gives a lively shade of green which is also refreshing to the eyes. If you are planting edible plants like vegetables, you just might find a way to augment your food supply with safe homegrown produce. So start checking your house to create innovative garden ideas.

Share.

Leave A Reply

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. Full Cookie Disclosure...

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close