How to Fix Broken French Door Windows

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A broken window is not a DIY solution that should be postponed. Damaged window panes pose a number of risks to both safety and security, not to mention being economically lamentable. Not least of which thanks to the loss of insulation you’ll have to endure. With winter coming, it’s simply not a job you can afford to delay. This is especially when it comes to your French doors, which can be unsightly to say the least.

There are a number of ways that window panes can suffer chips, cracks, and, in some extreme cases, complete shattering. From simple accidents around the home to drastic temperature changes. Your French doors may have been a costly installation job, but they are not immune from needing repair. Don’t allow your home’s elegance to be compromised; follow this guide to replacing French door panes.

Step One

Assess the damage and try to get to the bottom of the problem. Understanding how the damage came about will help you better prepare for the future, and avoid the same happening again. Wearing safety gloves, clean up the mess as to avoid anybody hurting themselves on the broken glass.

If you find the door is completely shattered, you’ll need a temporary solution. If you have some old polythene packaging lying around the garage, this is a great option for retaining heat in the meantime. If the extent of the damage is a little less severe, cover the cracks on both sides with adhesive tape to stop further cracks from developing.

Step Two

Once you’re ready to start the repair (and have all the tools you’ll need), you can get to work. If the window is still in its frame, you need to set about removing it. See this guide to removing a window pane from its frame for further details.

Begin by measuring up the dimensions of the window including the frame. Then, subtract around 1/8th of an inch. Armed with these measurements, accurately mark them on a large sheet of safety glass using a permanent marker. Using a straightedge and a glass cutter, cut out the shape of the window while wearing safety goggles.

Step Three

Ensure that all shards of glass are removed from the perimeter of the French door frame, then fill it with a glazing compound. Before it is allowed to set, gradually push the carved glass into place. Ensure its stability by pushing glazing points into the frame using a specialist glazing knife. Now simply reverse the steps you took to remove the original panel, including replacing all the necessary stops and heads. From there, it’s all about finishing up the presentation. Fill any gaps with wood filler, sand it down as desired and paint.

If a full replacing job wasn’t required, you could simply fill the cracks, but take heed. This is only a short-term solution, and the above process will need to be followed eventually. Cracks appearing in glass greatly compromises its structural integrity. There’s a high chance the pane could shatter suddenly in time. Use the above tips to guide you through the repair process and have your French doors as good as new in no time.


How to Fix Broken French Door Windows

0
Share.

A broken window is not a DIY solution that should be postponed. Damaged window panes pose a number of risks to both safety and security, not to mention being economically lamentable. Not least of which thanks to the loss of insulation you’ll have to endure. With winter coming, it’s simply not a job you can afford to delay. This is especially when it comes to your French doors, which can be unsightly to say the least.

There are a number of ways that window panes can suffer chips, cracks, and, in some extreme cases, complete shattering. From simple accidents around the home to drastic temperature changes. Your French doors may have been a costly installation job, but they are not immune from needing repair. Don’t allow your home’s elegance to be compromised; follow this guide to replacing French door panes.

Step One

Assess the damage and try to get to the bottom of the problem. Understanding how the damage came about will help you better prepare for the future, and avoid the same happening again. Wearing safety gloves, clean up the mess as to avoid anybody hurting themselves on the broken glass.

If you find the door is completely shattered, you’ll need a temporary solution. If you have some old polythene packaging lying around the garage, this is a great option for retaining heat in the meantime. If the extent of the damage is a little less severe, cover the cracks on both sides with adhesive tape to stop further cracks from developing.

Step Two

Once you’re ready to start the repair (and have all the tools you’ll need), you can get to work. If the window is still in its frame, you need to set about removing it. See this guide to removing a window pane from its frame for further details.

Begin by measuring up the dimensions of the window including the frame. Then, subtract around 1/8th of an inch. Armed with these measurements, accurately mark them on a large sheet of safety glass using a permanent marker. Using a straightedge and a glass cutter, cut out the shape of the window while wearing safety goggles.

Step Three

Ensure that all shards of glass are removed from the perimeter of the French door frame, then fill it with a glazing compound. Before it is allowed to set, gradually push the carved glass into place. Ensure its stability by pushing glazing points into the frame using a specialist glazing knife. Now simply reverse the steps you took to remove the original panel, including replacing all the necessary stops and heads. From there, it’s all about finishing up the presentation. Fill any gaps with wood filler, sand it down as desired and paint.

If a full replacing job wasn’t required, you could simply fill the cracks, but take heed. This is only a short-term solution, and the above process will need to be followed eventually. Cracks appearing in glass greatly compromises its structural integrity. There’s a high chance the pane could shatter suddenly in time. Use the above tips to guide you through the repair process and have your French doors as good as new in no time.


Blog Uploaded: 18th November 2015


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