How to Damp Proof a Shed

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How to Damp Proof a Shed

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Whatever you want to use your garden shed for, it’s not going to be much good to you unless you can keep the elements out and the warmth in! Storing your stuff inside a dam shed will only lead to ruining them with mould, while if you want to work in your shed you’ll need a pleasant environment! Here is some advice for making your shed hardier…

Sealing

The first thing that you’ll want to do is seal the existing structure, so that when you start adding more insulation you know that there aren’t any cracks or gaps letting moisture in and undermining your efforts!

Start by replacing any broken windows and, especially if people are going to be spending time working or playing in the shed, consider installing double glazing – this will be essential for keeping the warmth in.

Next up is the door; this should be weatherproof, so either weatherproof the existing door or, more simply, replace it with a new one.

Once you’ve sealed up the doors and windows it’s time to move on to the ceiling and walls. Check for gaps in the ceiling by spraying a hose over the roof and seeing where the water gets in (alternatively you can wait for rainfall). You can patch up gaps with caulk or expanding foam, although if the leaking is excessive you may want to consider installing a new roof with a better drainage system.

You can fix up any gaps in the walls in the same way, and once done you should have a fully sealed shed exterior, ready to be insulated.

Whatever you want to use your garden shed for, it’s not going to be much good to you unless you can keep the elements out and the warmth in! Storing your stuff inside a dam shed will only lead to ruining them with mould, while if you want to work in your shed you’ll need a pleasant environment! Here is some advice for making your shed hardier…

Sealing

The first thing that you’ll want to do is seal the existing structure, so that when you start adding more insulation you know that there aren’t any cracks or gaps letting moisture in and undermining your efforts!

Start by replacing any broken windows and, especially if people are going to be spending time working or playing in the shed, consider installing double glazing – this will be essential for keeping the warmth in.

Next up is the door; this should be weatherproof, so either weatherproof the existing door or, more simply, replace it with a new one.

Once you’ve sealed up the doors and windows it’s time to move on to the ceiling and walls. Check for gaps in the ceiling by spraying a hose over the roof and seeing where the water gets in (alternatively you can wait for rainfall). You can patch up gaps with caulk or expanding foam, although if the leaking is excessive you may want to consider installing a new roof with a better drainage system.

You can fix up any gaps in the walls in the same way, and once done you should have a fully sealed shed exterior, ready to be insulated.

Insulation

There are a few different insulation options to choose between, depending on the specific conditions that your shed will be facing as well as its structural design. For a standard shed you will usually be looking at blanket or batt insulation, while for a shed with irregular studs it may be more advisable to use a polystyrene sheet.

If you’re worried about extreme high temperatures then you may want to use wool instead, while those lucky enough to have a shed that is already finished with drywall can simply use more expanding foam, which is easily sprayed into the gap between the interior and exterior walls.

With a standard option such as batting, fitting the insulation to the walls and ceiling isn’t too complicated, as you can use a staple gun to attach it to the studs; just make sure that it is secure! If you want to spruce up the interior once you’re done, cover the sheets of insulation with a layer of drywall.

Don’t Forget the Floor!

A lot of damp comes up from underneath the shed, so forget to damp proof the floor at your own peril! This is done by either installing a damp proof course membrane or fitting a second ‘fault’ floor and adding insulation between the two layers. Just remember that if you opt for this second option your head space will be reduced.

Good luck keeping that pesky damp out and securing your shed against the cold; follow the advice above and you should have a warm, cosy space in no time!

There are a few different insulation options to choose between, depending on the specific conditions that your shed will be facing as well as its structural design. For a standard shed you will usually be looking at blanket or batt insulation, while for a shed with irregular studs it may be more advisable to use a polystyrene sheet.

If you’re worried about extreme high temperatures then you may want to use wool instead, while those lucky enough to have a shed that is already finished with drywall can simply use more expanding foam, which is easily sprayed into the gap between the interior and exterior walls.

With a standard option such as batting, fitting the insulation to the walls and ceiling isn’t too complicated, as you can use a staple gun to attach it to the studs; just make sure that it is secure! If you want to spruce up the interior once you’re done, cover the sheets of insulation with a layer of drywall.

Whatever you want to use your garden shed for, it’s not going to be much good to you unless you can keep the elements out and the warmth in! Storing your stuff inside a dam shed will only lead to ruining them with mould, while if you want to work in your shed you’ll need a pleasant environment! Here is some advice for making your shed hardier…

Sealing

The first thing that you’ll want to do is seal the existing structure, so that when you start adding more insulation you know that there aren’t any cracks or gaps letting moisture in and undermining your efforts!

Start by replacing any broken windows and, especially if people are going to be spending time working or playing in the shed, consider installing double glazing – this will be essential for keeping the warmth in.

Next up is the door; this should be weatherproof, so either weatherproof the existing door or, more simply, replace it with a new one.

Once you’ve sealed up the doors and windows it’s time to move on to the ceiling and walls. Check for gaps in the ceiling by spraying a hose over the roof and seeing where the water gets in (alternatively you can wait for rainfall). You can patch up gaps with caulk or expanding foam, although if the leaking is excessive you may want to consider installing a new roof with a better drainage system.

You can fix up any gaps in the walls in the same way, and once done you should have a fully sealed shed exterior, ready to be insulated.

Insulation

There are a few different insulation options to choose between, depending on the specific conditions that your shed will be facing as well as its structural design. For a standard shed you will usually be looking at blanket or batt insulation, while for a shed with irregular studs it may be more advisable to use a polystyrene sheet.

If you’re worried about extreme high temperatures then you may want to use wool instead, while those lucky enough to have a shed that is already finished with drywall can simply use more expanding foam, which is easily sprayed into the gap between the interior and exterior walls.

With a standard option such as batting, fitting the insulation to the walls and ceiling isn’t too complicated, as you can use a staple gun to attach it to the studs; just make sure that it is secure! If you want to spruce up the interior once you’re done, cover the sheets of insulation with a layer of drywall.

Don’t Forget the Floor!

A lot of damp comes up from underneath the shed, so forget to damp proof the floor at your own peril! This is done by either installing a damp proof course membrane or fitting a second ‘fault’ floor and adding insulation between the two layers. Just remember that if you opt for this second option your head space will be reduced.

Good luck keeping that pesky damp out and securing your shed against the cold; follow the advice above and you should have a warm, cosy space in no time!

A lot of damp comes up from underneath the shed, so forget to damp proof the floor at your own peril! This is done by either installing a damp proof course membrane or fitting a second ‘fault’ floor and adding insulation between the two layers. Just remember that if you opt for this second option your head space will be reduced.

Good luck keeping that pesky damp out and securing your shed against the cold; if your looking for products to help protect against damp and mould be sure to check out Pam Ties the UKs leading supplier of dampproofing, waterproofing and structural remedial products.


Blog Uploaded: 30th November 2015


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