Acetylene Torch Tools

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Acetylene Torch Tools

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Acetylene torches are used to cut, weld, braze, heat, bend and silver-solder metals. It’s a very versatile tool with different torches for the different activities. Training is required to use the torch as there are many dangers, including high pressures, temperatures and the potential for explosion.


Step One

Cutting Torch - The acetylene cutting torch consists of a hose connection for acetylene, a hose connection for oxygen and shutoff valves. The torch itself has a separate passage for oxygen and acetylene. These two gases will mix in the mixing chamber of the torch and then flow out the cutting tip. There are many different cutting tips. The main difference between the cutting tips is the ability to cut through metals of different thickness. The cutting torch works by burning through metal in a rapid oxidation reaction. The metal doesn't actually melt.


Step Two

Welding Torch - The welding torch's function is to bind two metals together. The weld forms when the two pieces of metal are heated to a temperature where the metals create a shared pool of molten metal. This shared pool is created with the help of a metal filler. The type of metal used as the filler depends on the metals being welded. The welding tip contains one hole. The larger the hole on the tip, the thicker the metal that can be welded. There are two valves at the bottom of the welding torch to adjust the flow of acetylene and oxygen.


Step Three

Injector Torch - The injector torch is a pressure-dependent torch. There are low-pressure and medium-pressure injector torches. The torch has a pressure of 1 lb. per square inch or less. The pressure of oxygen as it moves through the torch produces enough suction to draw the acetylene into the mixing chamber. The injector head is a genera- purpose tool that's used for different functions.


Step Four

Rosebud Torch - The rosebud torch is used to bend or straighten metal. It's used over large areas of metal. The name rosebud relates to the shape of the flame at the tip. Instead of one opening, the rosebud torch has a number of small holes. This is the most difficult acetylene torch to use as it's difficult to keep the gas flows steady. Rosebud torches require a large acetylene supply. The larger the tip, the greater the acetylene needed to keep it working.


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